1. Approximately 2,300 children are reported missing each day in the United States, that one child every 40 seconds. 2. Nearly 800,000 people are reported missing every year in the United States. 3. May 25 th is National Missing Children’s Day. 4. In 1983 National Missing Children’s Day was proclaimed by President Ronald Reagan and commemorates the disappearance of Etan Patz who vanished in 1979. 5. After the abduction and murder of their son Adam, John and Reve’ Walsh helped create the National Center for Missing & Exploited Children (NCMEC) in 1984. 6. NCMEC’s Cyber Tipline began receiving reports in… Read More

Several federal laws in the United States are focused on the plight of unresolved missing persons and unidentified remains. Each law, the result of families of missing persons who searched every dark corner for their missing child and tirelessly worked to ensure changes would be enacted to avoid the pitfalls they experienced in search of their missing or murdered child. Each law represents a victim, who in their name, would ensure another child would have a better chance. As of May 31,2018, there were 87,608 active missing person cases in the Federal Bureau of Investigation’s National Crime Information Center (NCIC)…. Read More

When we hear the word “missing” we often think of missing children. When we walk into Walmart the faces of missing children stare back at us and the missing child cases that receive public and media attention are often the most extreme examples, such as the case of Ayla Reynolds. One-year-old Ayla Reynolds vanished from her home on December 16, 2011, in Waterville, Maine. Her arm in a sling, Ayla was last seen wearing green pajamas with “Daddy’s Princess” on the front. Six years later, Ayla’s disappearance remains a mystery. It is quite common there is less concern for adult… Read More

According to the National Crime Information Center (NCIC) at the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI), there are 86,927 active missing persons cases as of April 30, 2018.  These cases include juvenile disappearances, endangered missing, involuntary or “non-family” abductions, those with disabilities, catastrophe victims and those entered into NCIC as “other.” When a person we love goes missing, a time of great emotional turmoil and intense ambiguity follows. Dr. Pauline Boss said decades ago, having a loved one go missing is one of the most traumatic of human experiences. Not only are families trying to manage the trauma of “not knowing”… Read More

1. Making a Police Report Families know their family members best and when a loved one goes missing, it is recommended to make a police report sooner than later. Begin with contacting the police or sheriff’s department within the jurisdiction that missing person was last seen or known to be. Reports involving missing children, police are required by federal law to take an immediate report and enter the child’s descriptive information into the FBI’s National Crime Information Center (NCIC). However, one should understand is there is no federal law requiring local law enforcement to take an initial report a report of a… Read More

Below is a several year old interview with Kym L. Pasqualini appearing on tru TV Crime Library pointing out how race, gender, age, and even socioeconomic status affects the response to missing person cases. To read Damsels in Distress click on the link below. tru TV Crime Library with Kym L. Pasqualini Advancements in the national response to missing person cases Working eighteen years in the field of missing persons and homicide victims, I have witnessed significant advancements, yet there are still many necessary improvements needed to ensure all missing persons have equality of services and fairness in media. Desperately… Read More