Adults Have the Right to Go Missing but That Doesn’t Mean They Don’t Need Help

Adults Have the Right to Go Missing but That Doesn’t Mean They Don’t Need Help

On any given day, nearly 100,000 people are listed as active missing in the United States.

(On any given day, nearly 100,000 people are listed as active missing in the United States. Photo courtesy Creative RF/Getty Images.)

Most of us are aware of our inalienable rights to life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness. But for most American’s there is a lesser-known right . . . the right to go missing. 

As of April 30, 2018, there were 86,927 active missing person cases in the National Crime Information Center (NCIC) at the Federal Bureau of Investigations. Of that number 14,411 are listed as endangered by authorities. 

While most cases will resolve quickly, others date back decades. 

“If you, as an adult, want to take off and need some time alone, you’re entitled to do that,” according to St. Cloud Police Assistant Chief Jeff Oxton. “That’s the right to go missing and can generate legitimate and sometimes illegitimate concerns from others.” 

At the age of 18, going missing is not considered an offense. Unless the adult has been found to have significant issues with mental health, or if they are legally under the care of another person, it is not a crime to go missing and most resolve without incident. 

“Most missing persons, we find them OK,” said Oxton. “We find there’s been a misunderstanding, or there was another reason they weren’t where they were supposed to be.”

However, that doesn’t always mean that all missing person cases are resolved with expediency. 

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(Missing Marine veteran Jesse Conger vanished from his Scottsdale home August 14, 2019.)

Police in Scottsdale, Ariz., are searching for missing Marine veteran Jesse Conger who vanished without a trace on August 14, 2019. Loved ones fear he may be suffering from Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) and depression. Conger had served for 10 years and deployed to Iraq and Afghanistan during his military service. 

Authorities say Conger was last seen at his apartment in Scottsdale by his girlfriend Natasha Harwell and may be driving a 2015 Toyota Camry with Nevada license plate number 696G03. 

“I asked him to get help. He kept telling me, ‘No.’ but I feel like I should have insisted a little bit more,” Harwell said. 

When Conger did not come home and never answered her calls or texts, she reported him missing. She noticed his gun was missing but all other personal belongings left at his home, including his wallet with identification, debit card, credit card, and all necessities. His service dog was also left behind. 

“I feel like all the times before when he has done this, it was more like—you could know something was about to happen. He would talk to me about it, I could talk to him. This time he just picked up and left,” said Harwell.

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(Jesse Conger is a United states Marine with PTSD who has been missing for a month from Scottsdale, Ariz.)

The search has gone viral after a tweet from Pulte Group CEO Bill Pulte offered a $30,000 reward to help find Conger.

“I don’t know if I would be alive without my twin brother,” Patricia Conger said. “He’s always been with me. I want you to come home Jesse, please come home and I love you.” 

Scottsdale Police Department is treating Jesse Conger’s case as an “endangered missing person” and added him to the NCIC system at the FBI. 

What Happens When a Missing Person is Entered Into NCIC?

Once someone is entered into the NCIC database they are flagged as missing making their information available nationwide. For example, if they disappear from California and get pulled over or questioned by authorities in Arizona, police are quickly able to run their information through NCIC and make a determination if the individual is possibly a danger to themselves or others. This enables authorities to take them to the hospital. 

There are five categories in NCIC that a missing person can be classified in.

  • Juvenile
  • Endangered
  • Involuntary
  • Disability
  • Catastrophe
  • Other

When a person is added to NCIC, it makes their descriptive and automobile information available to all law enforcement agencies, medical examiners and Coroners in the country.

It is a common misconception that when an adult goes missing, a reporting party must wait 24 hours before making a report to police. 

“There’s just not (a waiting period,)” Oxton said told the Sy. Cloud Times. “And I think that comes back to, you know, people see it on TV, or whatever, that they have to be missing for 24 hours. But that’s just not true.

In fact, there is no national mandate that requires one to wait before going to the police to report an adult missing. 

However, when a child goes missing there is a national mandate requiring law enforcement to accept an immediate missing report, report it to the FBI and enter the person’s descriptive data into NCIC. This is due to the age and vulnerability. Though this national mandate does not apply to missing adults, there still exists no required waiting period to report them. 

When there is a reporting delay for some reason, or something bad has happened, the first two hours are critical.

After receiving a missing person report, police will attempt to find the person in question, which may include contacting the person who made the report, along with friends and family, hospitals and jails. 

If police discover the person went missing on their own accord, legally police cannot tell the reporting party where they are if the missing person does not wish friends and family to know. Police can let the reporting party know they are alive and well and do not wish contact. 

Authorities are expected to make informed judgment calls about whether the missing person is at risk of death or injury. If the person is considered “endangered” it adds more urgency to the case, meaning law enforcement has received enough evidence that the person is at risk for personal injury or death due to one of the following:

  • the person is involuntarily missing or result of an abduction;
  • the person is missing under dangerous circumstances; 
  • there is evidence the person is in need of medical attention or needed medication such as insulin, that would severely affect the person’s health;
  • the person does not have a history of disappearing;
  • the person is mentally impaired or has diminished mental capacity, such as someone with Alzheimer’s or Down Syndrome;
  • the person has been the subject of acts of violence or threats;
  • there is evidence the person may be lost in the wilderness or after a catastrophic natural event;
  • any other factor that law enforcement believes the person may be at risk of physical injury or death. 

Once there is a report on a missing person, it then becomes crucial that law enforcement obtain dental records, fingerprints and have the family submit a DNA sample into the Family DNA database. 

Records and samples are regularly cross-referenced with Unidentified Persons, alive and deceased for matches. 

Jesse Conger is listed as “endangered” in NCIC due to his mental state when he went missing. But what happens when the trail goes cold? 

Until a missing person is found, their entry in NCIC remains active. Once entered police do not stop investigating the case and following up on every lead that is provided by the public.

However, some cases, like Conger’s do not resolve right away and it becomes necessary and effective for police to ask for the public’s help to generate new leads. 

Family and friends commonly try to engage the public and community to help find the missing person, including setting up Facebook Pages to generate leads and offer rewards for information. 

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Behind every missing person appeal, and every headline is an individual story and a family experiencing heartbreak. 

“For law enforcement, at times searching for a missing person is like searching for a needle in a haystack,” says Thomas Lauth, a missing person expert, and CEO of Lauth Investigations International. “Often an effective investigation is a cooperative effort between law enforcement, the public, and the media. 

Lauth has worked on missing person cases for over 25 years, working with local, state and federal law enforcement. “Generating that one lead that law enforcement needs to progress with the investigation becomes of utmost importance.” 

Inevitably some cases go cold but that doesn’t mean the case is closed or impossible to solve.  

 “While missing persons have the right to go missing, the police still pour all of their resources into investigating the disappearance which should be reassuring to families who are experiencing the trauma of having a loved one missing,” says Lauth. 

Top 10 Mysterious Missing Person Cases

Top 10 Mysterious Missing Person Cases

Mysterious missing person cases are not hard to come by, and high profile missing person cases stay with us as a nation. Despite lapses in coverage, when we see their photo again, we are reminded of the details we know about the case, our personal feelings based entirely in speculation, and remember all over again that there is still a family waiting for them to come home. The more mysterious the circumstances, the more we stare in horror, watching their family’s world fall apart. Here are ten of the most fascinating and mysterious missing persons cases in recent history.

karlie guse

10: Karlie Gusé

The night before she disappeared, Karlie Gusé was seen at a party with friends in a neighborhood not far from her home in Chalfant Valley, CA. She called her stepmother in a panic, saying she needed to be picked up from the party. Melissa Gusé picked Karlie up from the party, and later stated that she seemed disoriented and exhibited paranoid behavior. Once home, it took hours to get Karlie calmed down enough to sleep. When Melissa awoke the next morning, October 13, 2018, Karlie was asleep in bed, but when she checked on her a second time around 7AM, Karlie was nowhere to be found. Law enforcement canvassed the neighborhood and turned up two witnesses who said they saw Karlie walking towards Highway 6 with a piece of paper in her hand. All of Karlie’s belongings, including her cell phone, were found at her home. Karlie had been experiencing problems prior to disappearing. Her father and stepmother acknowledged Karlie’s history of experimenting with drugs and attending alternative education in order to improve her grades. Despite these factors, there appeared to be nothing that would have prompted Karlie to leave the house that morning. Investigators, both in law enforcement and independent firms continue to search for Karlie, while her father, stepmother, biological mother, and the rest of her family wait anxiously for Karlie to come home.

9: Teresa Butler

teresa butler

Teresa Butler’s husband came home on January 25, 2006 to find his wife gone, their two young children unsupervised. At the time, the family was living in Risco, Missouri. There were no signs of a struggle, nor forced entry, but there were a series of valuable items missing from the home such as a gaming console, camcorder, stereo, and Teresa’s cell phone and purse. Her car was still in the driveway, and her wedding bands were also at the residence. Investigators were stymied by this mixed bag of a scene. Was it a crime scene? Or had Teresa simply left of her own accord—and if so, for what reason? More whirlwind revelations came when investigators realized that Teresa’s cell phone made two calls after she had vanished. Both calls were to unfamiliar numbers, in two different Missouri towns. The owners of those numbers both claimed that they had no idea who Teresa was, and did not speak to her. Thirteen years later, there are still no answers in her disappearance.

8: Laureen Rahn

In 1980, Laureen Rahn was living with her mother in an apartment in Manchester, New Hampshire. She was last seen on April 26 at that apartment in the company of two friends. When her mother returned home that evening, she had to grope for the door because all of the lightbulbs in the hallway had been unscrewed. When she entered the apartment, she checked Laureen’s room, and she appeared to be asleep in her bed. The next morning, she realized the body she’d seen asleep in the bed was actually one of Laureen’s friends, and that friend was clueless as to Laureen’s whereabouts. Authorities treated Laureen’s case as a runaway, but details that emerged in October of that year cast a different light on the case. Her mother, Judith, noticed three calls to a California number on her phone bill that she knew she didn’t make. One was to a sexual assistance call line for teenagers, helmed by a doctor’s wife who took in runaways—could Laureen be with her? The second number was to a motel run by a child pornographer by the pseudonym “Dr. Z.” But unfortunately authorities were unable to connect the 14-year-old’s disappearance to either of these persons of interest. To this day, what became of Laureen Rahn remains a mystery.

7: Lauren Spierer

The Lauren Spierer case is one of the most mysterious missing person cases. Many Hoosiers are familiar with the cautionary tale of Lauren Spierer, an Indiana University Student who disappeared on June 3, 2011 after a night out partying with friends in Bloomington, Indiana. After leaving her apartment around 2:30 in the morning, she walked around the corner and was never seen again. It wasn’t until her boyfriend, Jesse Wolf, realized that Lauren had been separated from her phone that something was wrong. When he sent her a text message two hours later, one of the employees at Kilroy’s bar responded. Wolf reported Lauren missing. Witnesses who had seen Lauren that night reported that she was highly intoxicated, which might explain why she left both her cell phone and shoes behind at Kilroy’s. Her observed level of inebriation has led to speculation that Lauren might have been drugged while at the bar, possibly with a drug like GHB, also known as “the date-rape drug.” Her family has remained suspicious of the men she was reportedly hanging out with that night, claiming that they know something about their daughter’s disappearance. That being said, investigators also spoke to friends of Lauren’s who informed them she was known to use drugs when she partied as well as alcohol. As of January 28, 2016—when FBI and other investigating bodies searched a property in Martinsville for signs of Lauren with no success—Lauren still remains missing.

cynthia anderson

6: Cynthia Anderson

The disappearance of Cynthia Anderson is regarded as stranger than fiction. She vanished on August 4, 1981 from the law office where she worked as a secretary. Her personal belongings were missing, but her vehicle remained parked in the lot. While investigating her disappearance, authorities discovered an open romance novel. In an eerie coincidence, Cynthia had stopped reading during a scene in which the main character is abducted. Police were already investigating Cynthia’s disappearance with the possibility of foul play, but this gave them pause. Could she have faked her own abduction to disappear and start over? There were anonymous tips months after her disappearance that she was being held captive in the basement of a remote residence, but authorities were unable to corroborate this statement. The wildest theory about her whereabouts came when a lawyer from her firm was arrested for drug trafficking. There was speculation that Cynthia might have known too much about some illegal dealings going through the law firm, and met a violent end as a consequence. But that’s all it is: a theory.

maura murray

5: Maura Murray

Some mysterious missing person cases get so big they invite a great deal of media attention. Mara Murray is perhaps one of the most famous mysterious missing person cases in recent history. The University of Massachusetts Amherst student disappeared on February 9, 2004. In the days leading up to her disappearance, Maura told university staff and her professors that she would be taking a week’s hiatus from school to handle a family emergency. Around 7:30 that night, a car crash on Route 112 was reported to 911. When first responders arrived, the driver, Maura, was nowhere to be found. During the investigation, law enforcement turned up a witness who had passed Maura following the crash. When asked if she needed help, she said no, that she had called roadside assistance. In a window of less than 15 minutes, something happened to Maura Murray. What’s most puzzling about Maura’s disappearance is that her story about a family emergency could not be corroborated by her family. So the question remains: Why was Maura taking a week off from her education? What could have been so important? Maura Murray’s disappearance is regarded as the first missing person case of the social media age, having disappeared the week that Facebook launched. Her story has spawned many true-crime specials, documentaries, and a highly popular podcast called Missing Maura Murray.

4: Asha Degree

Asha degree was just nine years old when she left her house on the morning she disappeared, Valentine’s Day, 2000. Inexplicably, she had packed her school backpack and left the house in the early morning hours, after which she was sighed walking along North Carolina Highway 18, just a little over a mile from her home. When approached by passing motorists who noticed her, Asha reportedly ran into a wooded area just off the highway. At first, it appeared to investigators that Asha had run away from home. After interviewing family members, they learned that the child had bene reading a fantasy series about children who have spectacular adventures while the adults are asleep. While it’s unclear whether or not Asha intended to return home, early search efforts for her proved fruitless. Belongings of hers, including a pencil, marker, and Mickey Mouse hair bow were found near a shed behind a business that sat parallel to the highway. About 18 months later, Asha’s bookbag also turned up at a construction site, curiously double-bagged, leading investigators to think someone other than Asha had left it there. In  October 2018, investigators were appealing to the public for information regarding two key pieces of evidence—a children’s book that was borrowed from the Fallston Middle School library in 2000, and a New Kids on the Block shirt. Asha Degree remains missing to this day.

annette sagers

3: Annette Sagers

Eight-year-old Annette Sagers went missing on her way to school in October of 1988. Less than a year earlier, her mother, Korinna Lynne Sagers Malinoski had gone missing. There was little evidence to paint a picture for investigators, except that her car was found parked in front of their home. When Korinna’s daughter went missing as well, they searched the bus stop where she should have been picked up for school. Investigators found a cryptic note that placed her mother’s disappearance in a whole new context: “Dad, momma come back. Give the boys a hug.” Authorities weren’t sure what to make of the note at first, as they suspected someone may have forced Annette to write. After careful examination, handwriting experts did determine that Annette likely wrote the note. This looks like Korinna could have disappeared of her own accord a year prior, and had returned to reclaim her daughter before vanishing again. What could not be explained was that Korinna had left behind two boys when she disappeared in 1987. Despite anonymous tips that claimed burial locations for Annette’s remains, the mystery of the missing mother and daughter remains unsolved.

2: Tara Calico

The case of Tara Calico continues to haunt the true-crime world, with both investigators and armchair detectives alike speculate to the circumstances surrounding this bizarre case and its sensational clues. Like Annette Sagers, Tara Calico disappeared in 1988 after leaving her home in Belen New Mexico to being a bike ride along Highway 47. Tara was never seen again. In the search for Tara, pieces of her Walkman were found along Highway 47. The bike was never recovered. Leads in the case dried up and it went cold until a year later when a disturbing piece of evidence emerged that has become famous throughout the internet. In Port St. Joe, Florida, a woman reported that she had found a Polaroid outside in the parking lot of a local convenience store. The Poloaroid featured a boy and a young woman, both bound and gagged, propped up against pillows in what appears to be the cargo area of a panel van. The witness told authorities that a white van had previously been parked in that spot, driven by a white man with a mustache. There is still speculation to this day about whether or not the woman in the photo is actually Tara Calico. The book lying next to the young woman in the photo is V.C. Andrews’ My Sweet Audrina, which was allegedly one of Tara’s favorite books. While no official cause for Tara’s disappearance has ever been established, the sheriff of Valencia County offered his theory: He claimed that boys who knew Tara were involved in some kind of accident along Highway 47, involving Tara’s bicycle and the boys’ truck. However, without a body, law enforcement were unable to make a case. 

1: Diane Augat

In 1998, 30-year-old Diane Augat of Odessa, Florida walked out of her home and vanished without a trace. About ten years prior to her disappearance, Diane received a diagnosis of bipolar disorder, a mental illness that causes massive mood swings between periods of intense emotional euphoria, or highs, and deep depressive lows. Her case was so severe that it led to losing custody of her children and her husband divorcing her in 1991. She self-medicated with drugs and alcohol. On April 10, 1998, Diane left her home and was never seen again. What followed was a series of strange events that amount to the plot of a Hollywood movie. Just three days after she vanished, her answering machine received a chilling message, “Help, help, let me out,” followed by “Hey, gimme that.” It sounded as though there was a struggle over the phone in the background. The caller ID said Starlight, but when Diane’s mother called back, there was no answer. Two days after that, the severed tip of Diane’s right middle finger was found. Two weeks later, in perhaps one of the most bizarre events in any missing person case, a bag of her clothing was found in the freezer of a local convenience store. Despite the details reflecting that of a Hollywood blockbuster thriller, there has never been any satisfying resolution in her case.  

NORRISTOWN MOTHER OF FOUR FOUND SAFE

NORRISTOWN MOTHER OF FOUR FOUND SAFE

For the last two weeks, the family of a missing Norristown mother have been fearing the worst.

Jessica Guidici, 32, had been missing for eight days when authorities finally listed her as missing. In her absence, four children were left without a mother. The longer family went without hearing from her, the more concerned they grew, as no one in the family who has spoken out about Guidici’s disappearance made any indication she would leave her children of her own free will.

Their concern was only compounded by the circumstances surrounding the last confirmed sighting of Guidici. She was last seen on June 12th in the local Norristown McDonald’s parking lot around 9:00 in the morning. According to the Find Missing Jessica Guidici page,She was last seen with Alex Webster, who has also since gone missing. Webster has deleted his Facebook account…According to the press release, Jessica was in visible distress when she was last seen.” Other witnesses told various media outlets she was visibly upset and crying.

Despite these reports, her case was not being treated as suspicious.  In a Facebook post, one of Guidici’s close friends expressed her frustration, “Even if she WAS MAD AT HER MOM AND FELL IN LOVE AND WANTED TO RUN AWAY, she would have called one of us. No matter what.” It sounds ludicrous given the reported circumstances of her last sighting, but this is not uncommon in the case of missing adults. Without any evidence of a disturbance, law enforcement are not always able to assume the worst right away, as adults can come and go without explanation.

On June 27th, Norristown law enforcement reported Jessica Guidici had been found safe. She told investigators she dropped out of contact with her family of her own free will and advised she had never been in danger. While her family can breathe a sigh of relief she’s been found alive, the circumstances of her disappearance still remain a mystery.

This is a developing story…

Carie McMichael is the Communications and Media Specialist for Lauth Investigations International, writing about investigative topics such as missing persons and corporate investigations. To learn more about what we do, please visit our website.

MYSTERY STILL SURROUNDS DISAPPEARANCE OF CHRISTIAN GLEN HALL

MYSTERY STILL SURROUNDS DISAPPEARANCE OF CHRISTIAN GLEN HALL

Christian Hall vanished at age 15 from his home in Corpus Christi, TX on November 4, 2005. Six years have passed without any word from the teen classified as an Endangered Runaway in the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) National Crime Information Center (NCIC) database and profiled an age progression of what he might look like now on the website of the National Center for Missing Exploited Children.

Christian Glen Hall

Christian was sighted in the company of an adult David Todd Andrews, who also went by the name Captain Dusty. They were last seen on Andrew’s 54-foot yacht Gypsy II, docked by the John F. Kennedy Memorial Causeway that connects Laguna Madre and north Padre Island with the Texas mainland. Christian apparently periodically worked on Andrew’s boat as a deck hand. It is believed Christian left willingly with Captain Dusty. A missing child report was not made by his mother until January 2006.

David Andrews’ Gypsy II 54 ft. yacht

Prior to their disappearance, Andrews had told his family that he had recently been informed Christian was his biological son which has been dis-proven. The two had indicated they were bound for the Key West, FL approximately 650 miles away but never arrived.

After their departure, on November 26th, it is reported a radio transmission was made by Andrews reporting his boat was taking on water and the engine on the vessel was not working. Around the same time, a civilian boater also reported to the US Coastguard they had seen the Gypsy II in the Gulf of Mexico approximately 65 miles southeast of Cameron, off the coast of Louisiana but said the two men on board declined assistance. The US Coastguard conducted an extensive search of the area to include Falcon flyovers of the area but there were no signs of the boat. Statements from the US Coast Guard indicate heightened concern when a boat does not arrive at its destination especially during that time period following Hurricane Katrina and Rita that left a lot of floating debris in the water. Authorities also reported there had been a storm in the area the evening of the Mayday radio call.

When speculating on the cause of the pair’s disappearance, one must consider the many dangers while in open waters. Some of the most common are weather related disasters, human error, failure to conduct proper maintenance, collision with a submerged object, even piracy can be causes of Maritime disasters and disappearances.

INTERNET SKEPTICS DEBATE OVER DISAPPEARANCE OF BOAT
Adding to the mystery and speculation of the pair’s disappearance were reports Andrews reportedly skipped bond on two charges of DUI. It is also reported Kidnapping charges were also filed against Andrews.
Skeptics on various Internet sites debate whether the Gypsy II really sank or if the pair may have even sent out the Mayday call to divert attention then quickly changed their route to another destination so Andrews could escape authorities and lived undetected. Regardless, there have been no signs of the two, leaving Christian’s family desperate for answers. The following YouTube Video was posted four long years ago by Christian’s family http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=r8C413H_nxI

CHRISTIAN GLEN HALL
CASE NUMBER: R0602001
DOB: 07/09/1990
RACE: White
HEIGHT: 5’ 7”
WEIGHT: 120lbs
EYES: Green
HAIR: Brown
CHARACTERISTICS: Scar on upper lip.

DAVID TODD ANDREWS AKA: CAPTAIN DUSTY
DOB: 06/08/1966
RACE: White
HEIGHT: 5’ 11”
WEIGHT: 200lbs
EYES: Hazel
HAIR: Brown/Black
CHARACTERISTICS: Scars on both legs

David-Andrews

CONTACT:
Corpus Christi Police Department
Detective J.R. Rodriguez
TEL: 361-886-2854

Texas Department of Public Safety
TEL: 800-346-3243